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Phone Interview Tips

Phone interviews are an important part of the job searching process, so it’s important to prepare yourself for them. 

Keep Notes About Your Work Experience

To begin, make sure you’re able to talk about your character, skills, work history, and experiences clearly and thoughtfully. One helpful way to prepare for this is to list on a sheet of paper your strengths and weaknesses. Then, write down a few notes about your work background and any specific skills you’ll bring with you to your new job. 

Think about your on-the-job experiences as well. Write down any work-related accomplishments that you find pertinent for the job in which you’re interested; also, if you’ve received any awards at work, write them down. 

Reflect on things you’ve learned about yourself through your work experience, being sure to note a couple of specific examples of how this knowledge came about.  

Research Company Prior to Phone Interview

Also, make sure you’re very familiar with the company to which you’ve applied. Do some basic research and take notes. Connect the company’s goals with your skills and be prepared to discuss.  

It’s important to be ready to talk about these specifics at a moment’s notice. If you’re actively on the job search, have a copy of your resume within reach of your phone. You may want to tape it to the top of your work desk or a nearby wall. 

Also, keep a few sheets of paper and a pen nearby to take notes during the interview. When a recruiter calls, it’s best to be ready.

Practice Responses for Your Phone Interview

Next, practice the interview. Carefully work your way through a list of possible phone interview questions and write down your answers in bullet-point form. Rehearse your answers until you feel you’re able to confidently and clearly respond to these questions. 

With a simple computer program or tape recorder, record your voice as you practice. Listen to the recording to judge your clarity and speed; also, listen for any verbal pauses such as “uh” or “um.”

During the Phone Interview

If a recruiter calls and it’s a good time to talk, fill a glass of water and head over to your prepared space. Be respectful and friendly while at the same time retaining a professional demeanor; speak clearly and slowly when answering questions. 

Also, don’t be afraid to smile during the interview—the positivity and confidence will be heard.

Additionally, you shouldn’t chew gum or eat during the interview.

Thank Your Interviewer

Upon completion of the interview, be sure to thank the interviewer. Send a brief, personal thank-you note in the mail to the company with which you interviewed.

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English for HR Managers – Language for Training and CPD (Continuous Professional Development)

3 Things That Separate Leaders From Managers

This post originally appeared at Open Forum.

 

To build a successful organization, there needs to be a variety of people playing different roles in order for things to run smoothly.

Some of these roles are easily defined while others may have more confusing boundaries, such as the difference between a manager and a leader. You can be a manager and a leader at the same time, but just because you’re a phenomenal leader doesn’t guarantee you’ll be a great manager, and vice-versa, so what’s the real difference?

In his book On Becoming a Leader, Warren Bennis writes about a few crucial differences between a leader and a manager. Here are some key differentiators from the book, as well as insights from Gene Wade, founder and CEO of UniversityNow, and late management guru Peter Drucker.

1. The leader innovates whereas the manager administersThis means that the leader is the one who comes up with new ideas and moves the rest of the organization into a forward-thinking phase. This person has to constantly keep his eyes on the horizon and develop new strategies and tactics. He needs to be knowledgeable about the latest trends, studies and skill sets.

“You got people who are just going to work instead of thinking about why they’re doing what they’re doing, and then you have the leaders,” Wade says.

On the other hand, a manager maintains what has already been established. This person has to keep her eye on the bottom line and maintain control or else there might be disorder within the organization. 

In his book The Wall Street Journal Essential Guide to Management: Lasting Lessons from the Best Leadership Minds of Our Time, Alan Murray cites Drucker as saying that a manager is someone who “establishes appropriate targets and yardsticks, and analyzes, appraises and interprets performance.” Managers understand the people who work alongside them and know which person is the best person for specific tasks. 

2. The leader inspires trust whereas the manager relies on control. Wade says that a leader is someone who inspires other people to be their best and knows how to appropriately set the tempo and pace for the rest of the group. 

“Leadership is not what you do—it’s what others do in response to you,” he says. “If no one shows up at your march, then you’re not really a leader.”

And if people do decide to jump on board because you’ve inspired them, then it means that you have created a bond of trust within the company, which is essential especially if the business is rapidly changing and needs people to believe in its mission. 

As for managers, Drucker wrote that their job is to maintain control over people by helping them develop their own assets and bringing out their greatest talents. To do this effectively, you have to know the people you are working with and understand their interests and passions. 

The manager then “creates a team out of his people, through decisions on pay, placement, promotion and through his communications with the team.”

“Managing a project is one thing, empowering others is another thing,” Wade says. 

3. The leader asks “what” and “why,” whereas the manager asks “how” and “when.” In order to ask “what” and “why,” you have to be able to question others why certain actions are occurring—and sometimes this involves challenging your superiors. 

“This means that they’re able to stand up to upper management when they think something else needs to be done for the company,” Wade tells us. “I always tell my folks, ‘I don’t expect to be right all the time. I expect to be wrong a lot.'”

If your company experiences failure, a leader’s job is to come in and say, “What did we learn from this?” and “How do we use this information to clarify our goals or get better at it?”

Instead, managers don’t actually think about what the failure means, Wade says. 

Their job is to ask “how” and “when” and to make sure they execute the plan accordingly. Drucker wrote that managers accept the status quo and are more like soldiers in the military. They know that orders and plans are crucial and their job is to keep their vision on the company’s current goals. 

Although the two roles may be similar, “The best managers are also leaders,” Wade says. “I think you can do both, but you have to take the time to cultivate it.”

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/3-things-that-separate-leaders-from-managers-2012-9#ixzz2VcltvQFP

Importance of Corporate Communication

Several professionals from the communication industry share the importance of corporate communication with IE University’s School of Communication.Testimonies were given during the 14th ICIG Symposium held at IE University.

Payroll

In a company, payroll is the sum of all financial records of salaries, wages, bonuses and deductions.

Paycheck

A paycheck is traditionally a paper document issued by an employer to pay an employee for services rendered. In recent times, the physical paycheck has been increasingly replaced by electronic direct deposit to bank accounts.

In most countries with a developed wire transfer system, using a physical check for paying wages and salaries has been uncommon for the past several decades. However, vocabulary referring to the figurative “paycheck” does exist in some languages, like German (Gehaltsscheck), partially due to the influence of US popular media, but this commonly refers to a payslip or stub rather than an actual check. Some company payrolls have eliminated both the paper check and stub, in which case an electronic image of the stub is available on an Internet website.

Pay Slip

A pay stub, paystub, pay slip, pay advice, or sometimes paycheck stub, is a document an employee receives either as a notice that the direct deposit transaction has gone through, or as part of their paycheck. It will typically detail the gross income and all taxes and any other deductions such as retirement plan contributions, insurances, garnishments, or charitable contributions taken out of the gross amount to arrive at the final net amount of the pay, also including the year to date totals in some circumstances.

Phone Interview Tips – How to Prepare for a Phone Interview Video – About.com

Many companies screen job applicants by having a phone interview before calling you in for face time. Find out how to pull off your phone interview without a hitch so you can get closer to nailing down that dream job.

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