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83% corporate execs in survey say employee mobility has a positive impact on a career progression

…international experience creates global mindset, grooms future leaders, drives competitive advantage in global biz…

BUT, they say that mobility teams have played no role in talent management and wider business objectives

Many corporate mobility executives surveyed said that their mobility teams played no role in talent management and wider business objectives, according to a new study conducted and then released by EY (Ernst & Young).

This is despite 83% stating that mobility has a positive impact on career progression, helping to create future leaders and drive competitive advantage for their organisations.

The study showed 42% of the respondents said they do not even have a global talent management agenda. EY global director human capital, Dina Pyron, said, “As companies becomes more globalised, it is important to have talent that understands how to compete in these diverse markets. Mobility professionals can play a more effective role in strategic business planning, rather than focusing on immediate needs to drive competitive advantage for their organisations. Mobility needs to be seen as a tool to enhance the talent pool, not simply an easy way to fill a vacancy without any strategic insight. The (global mobility) function must be connected or integrated with the talent management team, combining their specialist skill-sets to improve the retention and development of top talent and potential future leadership.”

The study, Your talent in motion: Global mobility effectiveness, found 78% of the 264 mobility executives interviewed reported that their mobility function did not measure return on investment (ROI).

Employers also failed to track an employee once an assignment is finished, such as employee retention, performance rating and career progression – with 16% of assignees leaving the company within two years of returning.

The study found many employers do not have the adequate procedures in place to track tax, payroll and immigration issues for those employees on global assignments.

Stephanie Phizackerley, EY Partner in the UK and Ireland global mobility practice, said: “For companies deploying more of their people into emerging markets, such undeveloped mobility policies and processes are restricting their ability to manage talent and run an effective program.”

Majority source for this info is EY (Ernst & Young) and also http://www.hrmagazine.co.uk .

 

SOURCE: http://www.globalbusinessmobiletalent.com/story.asp?sid=1734

Phone Interview Tips

Phone interviews are an important part of the job searching process, so it’s important to prepare yourself for them. 

Keep Notes About Your Work Experience

To begin, make sure you’re able to talk about your character, skills, work history, and experiences clearly and thoughtfully. One helpful way to prepare for this is to list on a sheet of paper your strengths and weaknesses. Then, write down a few notes about your work background and any specific skills you’ll bring with you to your new job. 

Think about your on-the-job experiences as well. Write down any work-related accomplishments that you find pertinent for the job in which you’re interested; also, if you’ve received any awards at work, write them down. 

Reflect on things you’ve learned about yourself through your work experience, being sure to note a couple of specific examples of how this knowledge came about.  

Research Company Prior to Phone Interview

Also, make sure you’re very familiar with the company to which you’ve applied. Do some basic research and take notes. Connect the company’s goals with your skills and be prepared to discuss.  

It’s important to be ready to talk about these specifics at a moment’s notice. If you’re actively on the job search, have a copy of your resume within reach of your phone. You may want to tape it to the top of your work desk or a nearby wall. 

Also, keep a few sheets of paper and a pen nearby to take notes during the interview. When a recruiter calls, it’s best to be ready.

Practice Responses for Your Phone Interview

Next, practice the interview. Carefully work your way through a list of possible phone interview questions and write down your answers in bullet-point form. Rehearse your answers until you feel you’re able to confidently and clearly respond to these questions. 

With a simple computer program or tape recorder, record your voice as you practice. Listen to the recording to judge your clarity and speed; also, listen for any verbal pauses such as “uh” or “um.”

During the Phone Interview

If a recruiter calls and it’s a good time to talk, fill a glass of water and head over to your prepared space. Be respectful and friendly while at the same time retaining a professional demeanor; speak clearly and slowly when answering questions. 

Also, don’t be afraid to smile during the interview—the positivity and confidence will be heard.

Additionally, you shouldn’t chew gum or eat during the interview.

Thank Your Interviewer

Upon completion of the interview, be sure to thank the interviewer. Send a brief, personal thank-you note in the mail to the company with which you interviewed.

HR Practices in India

In this global marketplace, understanding of other cultures and their HR practices is invaluable. This learning module provides students with information about HR practices in India. It includes background information about India’s culture, HR practices and applicable federal HR laws. It is divided into three 50-minute classes and includes activities and quizzes for each class session. Click below link to access the PowerPoint files with teaching notes

Rao India HR Practices To Post

Professional Etiquette

Please Click the link below to download

Professional Etiquette

Is HR at Its Breaking Point?

hr-breaking-point

 

Some companies are choosing to do away with traditional HR departments and divvy up the duties to other departments, but not everyone agrees that’s such a good idea.

Three years ago, Toronto-based G Adventures held a funeral for its human resources department.

“We had a company function where I put up crossbones and skull with the title ‘Death of HR,’ ” says Bruce Poon Tip, founder of the adventure-travel company, which employs 1,500 people.

Poon Tip took the drastic action after spending a year looking for a veteran of the field to

become vice president of human resources, which would have been a new position overseeing the five-person department. He received 600 rèsumès and spent months interviewing candidates.

“Every meeting I had, I couldn’t wait for it to end,” he says. “It seemed like HR was the art of oppression. I knew I didn’t want that in my company.”

The debate over HR’s shifting function and format continues, but it is apparent that as executives shift their corporate priorities, HR is following suit. Some companies have chosen to outsource their HR functions; others have shifted responsibilities to front-line managers in efforts to transform HR leaders into business leaders; and some, like G Adventures, have no HR department whatsoever.

Poon Tip moved administrative tasks into the finance department and created two new departments. The so-called “talent agency” focuses on recruiting and talent management. The “culture club,” where everyone has the title “karma chameleon”—named after the hit 1980s song sung by Boy George—organizes everything from fundraisers for the company’s nonprofit foundation to holding celebrations whenever G Adventures wins an award.

Poon Tip’s approach wouldn’t work for many organizations, but a growing number of companies are reimagining their HR structures along with who executes their people strategies. Almost 45 percent of organizations indicated that they will change their HR structure by the end of 2013, according to Towers Watson & Co.’s 2012 HR Service Delivery Survey, up from 28 percent in the previous year’s survey.

Jac Fitz-enz, founder of the consulting firm Human Capital Source, says it’s time for the C-suite to forget tradition. Organizations should pull apart HR departments and place pieces where they fit naturally. “We have patched together a function that isn’t working very well,” Fitz-enz says.

If it’s the sunset of HR as we know it, the new era’s dawn can’t come soon enough for Robert Bolton, a partner in KPMG’s HR Transformation Center of Excellence. The field has “relentlessly pursued best practices and generic models” with a blind eye to business strategies or even industries. “If people are significant for your organization in relation to achieving a competitive advantage, and if you are trying to steal a march on your competition, then that calls for a differentiated HR function, not one that looks like everybody else’s,” Bolton says. This never-ending chase of best practices and copycat models has put HR in a “doom cycle,” he says. “To my mind,” he says, “HR has got to break out of that or die.”

Deerfield, Illinois-based Beam Inc. might be a bellwether of how larger organizations can branch out. The maker of Pinnacle vodka and Maker’s Mark bourbon is midway through reinventing its approach to HR and talent management, a process that began 18 months ago.

In October 2011, Beam became a stand-alone spirits company after Fortune Brands Inc. split up its three enterprises. Fortune Brands sold its golf business, best known for its Titleist golf balls. It then spun off Fortune Brands Home & Security, whose brands include Moen faucets. The remaining business, which includes the Jim Beam whiskey brand, became Beam Inc. It has 3,400 employees.

At the new Beam, executives wanted a culture that encouraged managers to think and act more like entrepreneurs. Based on that concept, they thought about what entrepreneurs do.

“If I’m an entrepreneur running a small business, the first thing I don’t do is go out and hire an HR person,” says Steve Molony, Beam’s director of people strategy and solutions. “If I’m starting a small business, I should be making all these decisions. Big companies get bloated with bureaucracies and these big, huge back offices that remove the business leaders from making some of these decisions. We wanted to reverse that trend when we were still lean and nimble enough to do this.”

Beam hopes to nurture what Molony calls “holistic managers,” who take on deeper HR responsibilities. “That means they don’t just have their job of operational and financial management of whatever part of the business they’re in,” Molony says. “But their responsibilities are to attract, develop, retain and compensate the people on their team, which are traditional HR roles that would have been done by centralized HR teams.”

Take plant managers. In the past, they would tell HR what role needed to be filled, wait for a list of candidates and then be told the new hire’s start date after making the selection.

In the future, plant managers first will decide whether the job is necessary. If it is, they next would decide whether they have an internal successor or need to look outside. They also would look at market data about salaries, negotiate the pay and onboard the new hire.

The change isn’t happening overnight. It requires training, such as helping managers and other leaders understand what would happen if they paid everyone at the 75th percentile of the market, for example. And they won’t be without help from seasoned HR professionals—just fewer of them.

As part of its transformation, Beam is centralizing its disparate HR departments.

 

It has adapted the business-partner model first championed in 1997 by Dave Ulrich, a business professor at the University of Michigan. His model rests on three pillars: a shared service center, whose centralized staff handles administrative and transactional tasks; centers of excellence, which offer specialized consultants on topics such as training or labor relations; and business partners who advise business-unit leaders on talent strategy such as succession plans.

Beam didn’t adopt Ulrich’s framework wholesale. Its tailored tactic lets the company have a leaner business-services staff and fewer HR business partners, Molony says. In the traditional framework, those HR practitioners would have handled many of the activities Beam envisions managers taking on.

The goal: Develop a better caliber of business leaders that will help Beam outperform its competition. It’s not an HR cost-cutting exercise, Molony says. “We feel like if we give our business leaders these skills, it will differentiate us in the market,” he says.

IN DEFENSE OF HR

The goal of HR leaders becoming business leaders and front-line supervisors taking on more HR-like work remains an aspiration, not a reality, particularly for small to midsize employers. “The HR people are absolutely drowning in many cases in the transactional-type stuff,” says management consultant Susan Heathfield, who covers HR for About.com.

At some companies, talent leaders see the potential for other departments to take over aspects of HR. At digital advertising agency Razorfish, Anthony Onesto, director of technology talent development, has asked his recruiting and marketing teams to get together so they work more closely and think about recruiting as a marketing effort. He acknowledges that recruiting likely will not become part of the marketing department, but he also thinks that much of what an HR department does could be done elsewhere.

“This HR group could be dissolved, and folks could be handed some of the responsibilities, and I think we would be OK,” says Onesto, emphasizing it’s a theory, not a plan. But if it happened? “There would be no need for someone like me,” he says. “I would have to reinvent myself. I’ve done it” before.

Other companies already rely on managers to lead aspects of what an HR department does elsewhere. The Container Store Inc., a Coppell, Texas-based retailer with 58 locations nationwide, holds store managers responsible for career development and employee morale, says Eva Gordon, vice president of stores. The Container Store also is famous for its training—263 hours for full-time employees in their first year.

“We hire fantastic people, we train them really well to understand leadership and communication, so who better to manage careers and guide people and answer their questions than their manager?” Gordon says.

Susan Meisinger isn’t so sure. “You can’t tell me there isn’t somebody who is making sure that no matter how they’re doing their talent recruitment, that it is being done in accordance with law and that they’re reaching a pool of candidates who have a higher likelihood of success,” says Meisinger, a consultant who retired as president and CEO of Society of Human Resource Management in 2008. “You can’t tell me there isn’t going to be some consultation going on when there are performance issues, sort of an adviser somewhere in the corporation to help managers improve performance when there are performance issues.”

At Netflix Inc., recruiting largely is considered the responsibility of the hiring manager. The recruiting team handles transactional aspects, and managers determine the market price for salaries through multiple channels, according to spokesman Jonathan Friedland. He declined to elaborate or comment further.

The video-streaming company raised eyebrows in 2011 when it sought a new HR director. Netflix specified that it wanted someone who “thinks business first, customer second, team and talent third” and did not want “a change agent, an OD practitioner, a SHRM certificate, a people person.”

FRUSTRATIONS WITH THE FIELD

Some observers saw the job posting as a reflection of the C-suite’s frustration with the HR field, which struggles to shed its image as little more than open-enrollment gurus and rule enforcers.

“HR has been for many years scoring on its own score card,” says Dick Beatty, professor of human resource management at Rutgers University.

A recent study suggests Beatty’s right. “Help people grow” was the No. 1 reason HR leaders cited for entering the profession, according the New Talent Management Network, a group of HR professionals started by Avon Products Inc.’s former vice president of global talent management.

“It’s lovely to talk about ‘business partner’ and ‘seat at the table,’ but the challenge for HR leaders is: Do they understand what’s being served at that table?” says Marc Effron, president of the consulting firm The Talent Strategy Group and founder of the network. “It’s a business meal. It’s not an HR meal.”

This gap may explain why CEOs rank talent as a top priority but don’t mention the HR function.

For example, Irv Rothman, president and CEO of HP Financial Services, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Hewlett-Packard Co., keeps talent management as a standing item on his executive team’s agenda. But he doesn’t see it as something the HR department should lead.

“It’s not an HR process,” Rothman says. “It’s a business process because it’s the business that sees people in action. HR has a role. They have a role in creating the environment and creating the infrastructure. For HR

to conduct talent management to me seems a little … I don’t know.”

In his book, Out-Executing the Competition, Rothman recommends that no CEO delegate the cultural implications of a merger to the HR department, which he describes as good at such things as benefits. “If the HR department is delivering that message and achieving that visibility, it’s not the inspirational leadership that people are looking for i

n the aftermath of a merger when just about everybody is as nervous as cat in a roomful of rocking chairs,” Rothman tells Workforce.

Survey after survey continues to find that HR leaders are

viewed as low status and better at transactional tasks than strategic planning. “If we’re doing our job well, people don’t say those things,” Effron says. “It’s very easy for HR to whine that people don’t respect us, but people respect those who deliver results.” The solution? Attract a fresh pool of talent into the field that understands business and wants to maximize profits, Effron says. “In many ways, it’s not: ‘Can we teach those in the field to do it better?’—it’s: ‘Can we get different people in the field who truly understand what it takes to succeed in this area?’ ” he says.

During the recession, many global organizations learned that they could do more with less if they had flatter HR departments, fewer job grades and health plans, and used more self-service tools, says Harry Osle, The Hackett Group’s global HR transformation and advisory practice leader.

The result: Leaner HR departments that add more value for every dollar spent than their peer groups and run by professionals skilled in analytics and consulting. “HR organizations in the future are going to be a lot thinner,” Osle says, “but they’re not going to disappear.”

Meisinger, the former SHRM president, says HR departments historically have become leaner during economic downturns. It’s more efficient to have managers do a better job of managing than wait for people problems to emerge and be pushed over to HR.

But even companies that boast that they have no HR department retain someone with HR expertise to help guide recruitment and talent management, she argues.

Still, technological advances will continue to transform the field. Companies have “dramatically” more self-service tools available now than they did 10 years ago, Meisinger says.

“That’s freeing up HR to focus on what it should be: getting in the right talent and making sure they’re developed appropriately and looking at the strategy of the business—where is the business going and what are the talent needs?” Meisinger says. “There are a lot of folks in HR who grew up in the transactional world who aren’t equipped to operate in the strategic world.”

THE BOTTOM LINES

  • Forward-looking companies use more technology and accomp
    lish more with fewer HR professionals.
  • 

  • Line managers and other functions are taking on responsibilities historically handled by HR departments.
  • 

  • HR leaders, expected to serve more as consultants, will need more business acumen and less traditional HR experience than their predecessors.

Source: http://www.workforce.com/article/20130405/NEWS02/130329989/is-hr-at-its-breaking-point

 

 

 

English for HR Managers – Language for Training and CPD (Continuous Professional Development)

3 Things That Separate Leaders From Managers

This post originally appeared at Open Forum.

 

To build a successful organization, there needs to be a variety of people playing different roles in order for things to run smoothly.

Some of these roles are easily defined while others may have more confusing boundaries, such as the difference between a manager and a leader. You can be a manager and a leader at the same time, but just because you’re a phenomenal leader doesn’t guarantee you’ll be a great manager, and vice-versa, so what’s the real difference?

In his book On Becoming a Leader, Warren Bennis writes about a few crucial differences between a leader and a manager. Here are some key differentiators from the book, as well as insights from Gene Wade, founder and CEO of UniversityNow, and late management guru Peter Drucker.

1. The leader innovates whereas the manager administersThis means that the leader is the one who comes up with new ideas and moves the rest of the organization into a forward-thinking phase. This person has to constantly keep his eyes on the horizon and develop new strategies and tactics. He needs to be knowledgeable about the latest trends, studies and skill sets.

“You got people who are just going to work instead of thinking about why they’re doing what they’re doing, and then you have the leaders,” Wade says.

On the other hand, a manager maintains what has already been established. This person has to keep her eye on the bottom line and maintain control or else there might be disorder within the organization. 

In his book The Wall Street Journal Essential Guide to Management: Lasting Lessons from the Best Leadership Minds of Our Time, Alan Murray cites Drucker as saying that a manager is someone who “establishes appropriate targets and yardsticks, and analyzes, appraises and interprets performance.” Managers understand the people who work alongside them and know which person is the best person for specific tasks. 

2. The leader inspires trust whereas the manager relies on control. Wade says that a leader is someone who inspires other people to be their best and knows how to appropriately set the tempo and pace for the rest of the group. 

“Leadership is not what you do—it’s what others do in response to you,” he says. “If no one shows up at your march, then you’re not really a leader.”

And if people do decide to jump on board because you’ve inspired them, then it means that you have created a bond of trust within the company, which is essential especially if the business is rapidly changing and needs people to believe in its mission. 

As for managers, Drucker wrote that their job is to maintain control over people by helping them develop their own assets and bringing out their greatest talents. To do this effectively, you have to know the people you are working with and understand their interests and passions. 

The manager then “creates a team out of his people, through decisions on pay, placement, promotion and through his communications with the team.”

“Managing a project is one thing, empowering others is another thing,” Wade says. 

3. The leader asks “what” and “why,” whereas the manager asks “how” and “when.” In order to ask “what” and “why,” you have to be able to question others why certain actions are occurring—and sometimes this involves challenging your superiors. 

“This means that they’re able to stand up to upper management when they think something else needs to be done for the company,” Wade tells us. “I always tell my folks, ‘I don’t expect to be right all the time. I expect to be wrong a lot.'”

If your company experiences failure, a leader’s job is to come in and say, “What did we learn from this?” and “How do we use this information to clarify our goals or get better at it?”

Instead, managers don’t actually think about what the failure means, Wade says. 

Their job is to ask “how” and “when” and to make sure they execute the plan accordingly. Drucker wrote that managers accept the status quo and are more like soldiers in the military. They know that orders and plans are crucial and their job is to keep their vision on the company’s current goals. 

Although the two roles may be similar, “The best managers are also leaders,” Wade says. “I think you can do both, but you have to take the time to cultivate it.”

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/3-things-that-separate-leaders-from-managers-2012-9#ixzz2VcltvQFP

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